MISS ONE THOUSAND SPRING BLOSSOMS by John Ball

MISS ONE THOUSAND SPRING BLOSSOMS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A goodish distance from the author's In the Heat of the Night, this simple-minded entertainment concerning the Japanese idyll of a gangly Mr. Deeds in the author's land of the rising gorge. Seems that Richard Emmett Seaton is sent by his employer, the industrial firm of Mercer and Doyle, to push through an advantageous deal with a supplier, Matsumoto and Company. Arriving in Japan, Seaton is all eager business until his virgin eyes are set alight by Miss Thousand Spring Blossoms, or Masayo, a geisha. Seaton runs up quite a geisha bill until he finally realizes that Masayo's attentions are metered. Tangle upon tangle as Seaton is courted by others, straightens out Mercer-Matsumoto affairs. Finally, in love with Japan, transferring his professional devotion to Matsumoto & Co., Seaton degeishas Masayo who consents to become his wife. Many ho-ho's as American-Japanese not understand languages; many nice men and ladies; Japanese baths (tee-hee); amiable stereotyper not miss a tlick. Fuji fudge.

Pub Date: Sept. 11th, 1968
Publisher: Little, Brown