THE MAN WHO LOOKED LIKE HOWARD COSELL by John Bartholomew Tucker
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THE MAN WHO LOOKED LIKE HOWARD COSELL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A deliciously frothy caper told with the true raconteur verve, by media-commentator/first-novelist Tucker. Harry Baker, a highly successful agent for high-priced media personnel, finally lifts his eyes from chum Alice's diaphanous blouse and who should he spy across the Oak Room bar but Howard Cosell. Only it's--just a look-alike. Several minutes later, Alice's jealous paramour Roger stops by, drop some francs into Harry's pocket, takes off for the men's room, where he's murdered--and the chase is on. Soon Harry's old Army pal Wendell Crittenden enlists him in a classified intelligence mission (so classified that Harry is not told what it's about); and Harry's off to a D.C. meeting with ""M""; in for a spot of torture by a lumpy Chinese maiden and a gorgeous Amazonian one; and whisked off to London and a passion-filled week with the Amazonian (he nicknames her ""Taiwan""--don't ask). Meanwhile, more secret types lurk about; Harry's shot at; and then suddenly his secretary Jane appears, and the two take it on the lam to Dublin--where Wendell, ""M,"" Alice, Taiwan, et al. all want to damage him, he thinks. The resolution, when it comes, has all the substance of the airiest Hitchcock MacGuffin: a right-wing plot that Harry exposes with true insider savvy during a live TV broadcast. An absolutely lightweight, charming and far-fetched fling. Tucker merrily skips over implausibilities--and so will the reader.

Pub Date: Nov. 16th, 1988
Publisher: St. Martin's