MEMOIRS OF A SMALL TOWN SURGEON by John Brooks Wheeler

MEMOIRS OF A SMALL TOWN SURGEON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An interesting volume to parallel with Morris' Fifty Years a Surgeon (Dutton -- page 28). For it covers approximately the same span of medical history, and is again a personal experience story. Dr. Wheeler is on the staff of the Vermont University Medical School, and this is the story of his professional career, from the days when antiseptic practices were unknown, to the present. He tells many stories of failures, successes, new discoveries, of the only true case of hydrophobia he encountered, of the fight against diphtheria before the antitoxin was discovered, of the struggle with antisepsis and asepsis, Lister leading the way. This is directed toward his professional audience. For his lay market, there are stories of tragedy, of eccentrics in the profession, of amusing patients, of fine friendships. The emphasis is on the ""case"" rather than the human being -- and for those who have no interest in medicine as such, the autobiography will be of slight interest. For the initiates, it will be a revealing story.

Pub Date: Feb. 21st, 1935
Publisher: Stokes