EARTH'S REMOTEST END by John C. Pollock

EARTH'S REMOTEST END

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An ""ordinary English person of the younger generation"" has done for all Christians a most extraordinary thing. He resigned his parish and took off with his wife to visit as much as he could of the Protestant missionary work in the Far East. This involved 33,000 miles of travel, in fifteen countries, with fantastic problems of transportation, communication and protocol to be worked out. He talked to Prime Ministers and beggars, to Kings and communists, to Christians and every conceivable type of non-Christians. Nepal, North Borneo and Japan are all within the scope of his inquiry. Fr. Pollock's method of telling his story reminds one of the artistic school known as pointillism, where a series of small dots develop the picture. So the author weaves skilfully together anecdotes, travel experiences, conversations, observations and interpretations. This makes for fast-paced reading, though the book must be read in its entirety to be appreciated for its insights and purposes. Fr. Pollock concludes: ""There are many people of Asia wide open to the Gospel. If the Christian nations as nations, and not as a sprinkling of individuals, set to the task of evangelism, the consequences would be startling.

Pub Date: Jan. 3rd, 1961
Publisher: Macmillan