RADICAL CHRISTIANITY AND ITS SOURCES by John Charles Cooper

RADICAL CHRISTIANITY AND ITS SOURCES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author, one of the more prominent contemporary theologians, pursues the general theme he treated in his earlier volume, The Roots of the Radical Theology. He sets forth as his purpose the two-fold aim of describing the failure of the church to be true to its nature in the revolutionary twentieth century, and of showing that the radical critics of church theology and practice are basically loyal. Those who proclaim that, ""God is dead,"" do so out of faithfulness to a living God. Identifying himself as a minister of the Lutheran Church, he accepts such criticism as may be directed toward him as the price of his loyalty to the church. The tone of the book, as the author concedes, is ""harsh"" because it is written out of disappointment, and because he seeks to arouse the church to a new reformation. The discussion is well informed not only theologically but sociologically and politically. A disturbing book, especially for those who may prefer that the church try to live by its past illusions.

Pub Date: Oct. 14th, 1968
Publisher: Westminster