THE ROOTS OF THE RADICAL THEOLOGY by John Charles Cooper

THE ROOTS OF THE RADICAL THEOLOGY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Radical theology"" denotes, for the author, primarily the current theological movement known as ""the death of God."" The intention of this discussion of that theology is to understand it generically, without defense or criticism. At the same time, Cooper sees the new trend as opening a positive way to the new theology demanded by our time. In developing his account of the roots of the new theology, the author goes back briefly to Greek thought, beginning with Xenophanes. He quickly moves to the Enlightenment, and summarizes the influences of Feuerbach, Nictzscho, Kierkegaard, who become formative agents in shaping the thought of Marx and Freud. Modern ""synthesizers""-- Hermann, Schweitzer, Bultmann and Tillich are then considered, and ""in spite of their heroic efforts"" each is shown to have failed to resolve the problems of theology vis-a-vis the contemporary world. Attention is given to various theological tendencies that have arisen in recent decades such as Biblical Criticism, the ""quest for the historical Jesus,"" ""demythologizing,"" liberalism and fundamentalism. The persistent question that moves through the whole argument is, ""How is theology possible in a time that recognizes its world view has no place for God?"" The answer of the radical theologians may not be final; but the author insists, with cogency, that it must be taken seriously. The style is clear, the pace lively. For amateur as well as professional theologians.

Pub Date: March 20th, 1967
Publisher: Westminster