THE MASTERS OF BOW STREET by John Creasey

THE MASTERS OF BOW STREET

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This no doubt is the capstone of the late Mr. Creasey's some 600 hasty shorter works -- a burly, bustling and only on infrequent occasion buxom novel, spanning a century and the long attempt to impose official law and order on the city of London where crime footpadded rampantly through the streets. For many years it was incorruptible John Furnival, a magistrate from a conglomerate family of bankers and shipowners, etc., whose long dream of establishing a professional police force does not come true in his foreshortened lifetime -- a crippling heart attack and decease after he has married a faithful widowed companion-housekeeper whose son by an earlier marriage will carry on the good fight, while his last born will be a truant and eventually head the riots. A period story then, with respectable attention to the times but characters who are rarely differentiated beyond their roles, and all moving with fair interest from the prisons of Newgate to the gallows of Tyburn Fair before the sun sets over the good Yard arm.

Pub Date: June 1st, 1974
Publisher: Simon & Schuster