THE JUNKIE PRIEST by John D. Harris

THE JUNKIE PRIEST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Village Haven, Incorporated, extraordinary first fruit of a Graymoor friar's twelve-year dream, has the amazed eye of a wary nation upon it. Founded and funded in 1962 by some of Greenwich Village's leading citizens, the Haven operates -- with cooperation from officialdom as a ""half-way house,"" an agency to which women may turn if they desire help in rejoining society after serving prison sentences. Most of the ""Haven girls"" are former drug addicts. In the history of penology, such women have always been alarmingly recidivistic. The Junkie Priest is Father Daniel Egan, S.A., slender, gentle, determined Chaplain of Narcotics Anonymous. Long study of the narcotics problem up and down the Eastern seaboard convinced him that recidivism could be reduced if transitional help were accessible. Father Egan's idea roused community support, and he established the Haven in a left. Avoiding bathos, Hearst journalist Harris has gone straight to the addiction problem's hideous core. His potent book will be released as news stories appear in connection with the Haven's move to expanded facilities; with its startling title, it will get a great deal of special publicity as more becomes known about this dramatic new concept in social-service philanthropy.

Pub Date: April 13th, 1964
Publisher: oward-McCann