WARREN: The Man, the Court, the Era by John D. Weaver

WARREN: The Man, the Court, the Era

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Ambitiously executing his large purpose, Mr. Weaver relates the story of the evolution of a most improbable man from his beginnings as a county prosecutor to his lengthy tenure as one of the most controversial Chief Justices who ever presided over the Supreme Court. In the author's view, Warren has been deeply imprinted by his experience on the bench and in turn has profoundly affected the nation's legal landscape and the quality and quantity of democracy that is available to its citizenry. Even a partial inventory of Court decision announced during his long reign can only serve to impress--desegregation, reapportionment, expansion of 5th and 14th Amendment rights, the secularization of the public school system, the expansion of the definition of a fair trial. Since this book is not limited to being a juridical biography, but follows a life-and-times approach as well, the author has ample scope to uphold a point of view that sees Warren as a man who hasn't changed as much as he has grown with each broadening opportunity that came his way. A thoroughly enjoyable book, from which the reader will come away with an enhanced sense of respect for the Court and affection for its amiable chief steward.

Pub Date: Sept. 26th, 1967
Publisher: Little, Brown