PROTESTANT THOUGHT AND NATURAL SCIENCE by John Dillenberger

PROTESTANT THOUGHT AND NATURAL SCIENCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The story of the effect that the development of natural science has had on Protestant thought from the time it came to terms with Copernicus, on through Robert Boyle and Isaac Newton, down to Darwin and the present time is interestingly traced and developed by Prof. John Dillenberger of Drew University. It is not a history of the conflicts between theology and science, nor of the harmony between the two. It is an attempt to penetrate behind the concrete issues to the underlying problems which exercised the major parties in the debates. For those who are at home in this field Prof. Dillenberger has provided much insight and food for further thought and study. Those who read at random may find little here to sustain their interest. The smaller second part, Notes on New Directions, dealing especially with Barth, Tillich, Bultmann and Heisenberg, is of greater, if briefer, interest because he writes of our generation. A book by a specialist for other specialists, whether in science or theology.

Publisher: Doubleday