VENUS, THE LONELY GODDESS by John Erskine

VENUS, THE LONELY GODDESS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Another of Dr. Erskine's lively pryings into the home life of the gods, into variations of old legends, which is often witty, always urbane. With many a sidelight on Olympian domesticity and conversation, the course of Venus' search for an understanding of love, of human beings, is played out. Her curiosity aroused by Jupiter's evasions, by Juno's taunts, by her husband, Vulcan's immovable opinions, and abetted by Mars, she makes her way to earth to answer the prayers of Polyxena who loves Achilles. She sees Achilles traitorously murdered; on her return to Olympus she finds Vulcan has introduced Charis as housekeeper; with the fall of Troy she again visits earth, witnesses Polyxena's immolation on Achiles' grave and travels with Pyrrhus. Deftly discursive with the sparkle of civilized chatter, this has its appeal for lighter, brighter moments.

Pub Date: Nov. 9th, 1949
Publisher: Morrow