THE STORY OF THOMAS MORE by John Farrow

THE STORY OF THOMAS MORE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

When dealing with such an interesting historical per as Sir More even indifferently written book such as this makes good reading. The author dis- any pretense of writing a biography, but attempts only ""to tell a story is terms of a man and his friends and his enemies, his time and circumsta"". The drown of the English statesman, humanist, poet and author is a sympathetic one. is made of his friendship with Erasmus and of his literary work, of which his is the best known. But, quite naturally, the bulk of the book deals with with Henry VIII under whom he served as Lord Chancellor, succeeding . He was deeply involved in the long drawn-out struggle of Henry to get rid Catherine of Aragon in order that be might marry Anne Boleyn. Staunch Cath that he was, More found this difficult enough to stomach, but he absolutely draw the line at taking the cathelic to the Act of Supremacy acknowledging the King to be the chief authority ever the English Church as against the Pope. For this refusal . A good picture of the unusual human qualities of the man is drawn. all will agres with the author's estimate of More's political career.

Pub Date: Oct. 20th, 1954