AN APACHE CAMPAIGN by John G. Bourke

AN APACHE CAMPAIGN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author of this first-hand account of one of the last campaigns against the Apaches, that of 1883 involving Geronimo and his Chiricahuas, was a scholar, anthropologist and humanitarian who served with General George Crook. Crook had more or less subdued the Apaches some years earlier, but in 1883 a band of 710 Chiricahuas under Geronimo, after plenty of provocation, broke bounds and started for Mexico, killing and raiding; establishing themselves in the mountains of Northern Mexico they continued to kill and raid. Crook, taking Bourke with him, was sent with soldiers from the United States to try to induce the Indians to make peace and return to Arizona, which he did after a long and difficult campaign entangled with delicate international relations. Vividly written by a soldier who understood Indians and knew the Southwest and enhanced by a long and excellent introduction by J. Frank Dobie, the book should find a place on the shelves of all libraries of Western Americana; it should appeal to professional and amateur Western historians and also addicts of plain ""westerns"".

Pub Date: Aug. 13th, 1958
Publisher: Scribner