EXCURSIONS INTO CHEMISTRY by John H. Woodburn
Kirkus Star

EXCURSIONS INTO CHEMISTRY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The many titles to appear on experiments are difficult to compare. A basic experiment is, after all, very much like a beginner's cook book recipe. It is only in the manner of presentation and in the organization that these books either stand out or evaporate into a collection. They all seem to sell like mad, especially to the school library market. This one seems destined to get used. The way the book has been organized is its special feature. Almost everyone is willing to admit that today's students are busy, heavily scheduled young people. Only a few of their books seem to recognize this and the assumption that they must read the whole of any book in non-fiction is apparent in the way the material in so many books is scattered, the many hasty indexes, the unannotated bibliographies, the rarity of analytic tables of contents, the seldom use of scanning lines or marginalia. This book certainly doesn't have all of these but does have an ordered approach to experiments. Each area in chemistry is given a separate chapter. Appropriate experiments are described and become progressively harder. These are followed by suggested projects to be carried on by the reader on his own hook. The vocabulary is precise without being repetitive or dull. The subtopic arrangement allows the pressured student to get right down to the section of the book which appeals to him most. Good.

Pub Date: Oct. 29th, 1965
Publisher: Lippincott