SEVENTEEN OF LEYDEN by John James

SEVENTEEN OF LEYDEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A quite competent exploitation of the 18th century picaresque novel with a bumptious hero, strenuous journeys, and corn popper action. Dr. Richard Oliver Wormset, a bleeder and leecher of considerable enthusiasm, and an agent of the ""Knott"" under the aegis of James II, sets out for the Indies to rescue five girls from indentured servitude there, among them Deborah, his intended bride. After boudoir and shipboard adventures, he does locate the ladies -- one, a prostitute, commits suicide, and three of varying degrees of fortune are content with their lots. But Deborah, whom he continues to seek with increasing passion, eludes him until she miraculously reappears in England ready for the wedding. The dialogue throughout is appropriately homiletic-cum-cheek, and the crowded, noisy scenes approximate the grain of the model. Neither scholarly nor sophisticated but decidedly entertaining.

Pub Date: Feb. 23rd, 1971
Publisher: St. Martin's Press