THE MORAL PHILOSOPHY OF WILLIAM JAMES by John K.--Ed. Roth

THE MORAL PHILOSOPHY OF WILLIAM JAMES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The moral philosophy of William James, with its recognition that man, in the final analysis, is to be defined in virtue of his limitations is ably set forth in this collection of texts from the philosopher's works. The selections generally fall into three categories: first, those concerning freedom and consciousness, qualities to which James' system of ethical values are essentially related; second, texts illustrating James' guidelines for ""moral"" behavior; third, excerpts from his writings on his (much misunderstood) pragmatism. Mr. Roth's introduction sets out the general lines of James' thought and gives the biographical and intellectual background complementary to his choice of selections. On the whole, the book represents an intelligent effort at firsthand synthesis, and it will prove useful to students of philosophy and ethics both as a well devised ""William James reader"" and as a sourcebook.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1969
Publisher: Crowell