KRNEST HEMINGWAY: THE MAN AND HIS WORK by John K.M.- Ed McCaffary

KRNEST HEMINGWAY: THE MAN AND HIS WORK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A collection of memoirs, profiles, and predominantly critical appraisals of the ""bronze god of the whole contemporary literary experience in America"", these reflect much of the excitement Homingway has aroused for more than three decades but are never unaware of the many immaturities in his work which has nonetheless been the spearhead and stimulus of his generation. There is Gertrude Stein's portrait of her protege in Paris as a young man; Malcolm Cowley's more contemporary Life magazine profile of ""Mr. Papa"", now grizzled and paternal, and the cheapening of his legend ""when he became the most public of his characters"" (Alfred Kazin); there is Elliot Paul criticizing his critics; but the majority of these essays deal with his individual or cumulative works, stress the obsession with physical courage and with death, the vision of life which was one of ""perpetual annihilation"" from war to the bull ring or the jungle, and the emphasis on action which must be virile and violent. The pieces by Maxwell Geismar and Alfred Kazin are of particular brilliance, and other contributors include Lincoln Kirstein, Max Eastman, John Peale Bishop, Edmund Wilson, Delmore Schwartz.

Publisher: World