THE OREGON DESERT by

THE OREGON DESERT

By
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KIRKUS REVIEW

This ""high desert"" is ""dry, cold, hot, sandy and full of geology"" and the facts about it are filled in by Mr. Jackman, whose chapters are more informative, and alternately Mr. Long, whose contributions are certainly plainer and more personal. Only occasionally do they collaborate. Jackman writes about the breeds of horses, the coyote and other flora and fauna, homesteading in a country (24,000 square miles of it) which is mostly federally owned since, although offered free, it found no makers. Long writes about his childhood, cattle driving, bronc riding, freighting for a living, etc. He also contributes some homemade homilies-- a string of them--like ""the early worm gets got."" Lots of photographs which, like the book, are variable; some have graphic illustrative value, others, family photographs, or the section (word and picture) on film folk on location have marginal value. All of it has a more concentrated regional interest than any other.

Publisher: Caxton