WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT DRINKING? by John Langone

WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT DRINKING?

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Though unfortunately the sixth juvenile we've seen on the subject in a year, this might also be the best--only the Silversteins' Alcoholism (1975) is worth mentioning with it, and Langone is even more conscientious about emphasizing the fuzziness of many terms (problem, excessive or heavy drinker, alcoholic, etc.), the contradictory results of similar studies and the inconclusiveness of others (especially in the sensitive areas of ethnic and religious groups' drinking behavior), and the pros and cons of different methods of treatment. His reports on alcohol's effects on different organs and systems of the body is current with ongoing research. Among the Findings (all of course duly modified or tentative) are links between moderate (as opposed to no) alcohol use and lower incidence of heart attacks; insurance statistics indicating that abstainers live longer than heavy drinkers but not as long as moderate ones; and the beneficial effects of wine on high blood pressure, the pain of angina, and geriatric homes' social life. Langone ends with his own unhappy memories of an alcoholic father and pleasant ones of maternal grandparents whose home-made wine enhanced evenings of food and conversation. He concludes that alcohol, ""for those who choose it, is a pleasant, relaxing experience."" We'll drink to that.

Pub Date: Aug. 1st, 1976
Publisher: Little, Brown