THE DEVIL'S NECKTIE

Lansing offers a debut novel about an ex–New York Police Department narcotics chief drawn out of retirement when drug-gang violence gets personal.

Jack Bertolino left his hometown of New York City for Los Angeles after back pain sidelined him from the force. Since then, he’s been gardening and nurturing his penchant for red wine. Things change, however, when Mia, a gorgeous Colombian informant whom Jack knew intimately, turns up murdered.  The brutal manner of her death, nicknamed “the Devil’s Necktie,” is a surefire sign that drug kingpins ordered the hit. The Los Angeles police initially suspect Jack but quickly clear him—and then rebuff him when he offers his help. He investigates the murder on his own, using his experience, instincts and invaluable connections from his cartel-busting days to unearth new evidence that makes the LAPD crawl back to him. He discovers a web of 18th Street Angels gang members, big-time Mexican and Colombian cocaine traffickers, and heartless criminals tied to Jack’s and Mia’s pasts. Lansing, a former writer for TV’s Walker, Texas Ranger and Scoundrels, crafts a compelling hero in Jack, who has a son at Stanford, an ex-wife back East, and classic tastes—including a fondness for Benziger wine, Miles Davis’ “Kind of Blue” album and his sterling gray Mustang GT. He has the appeal of a Hollywood leading man in the vein of Harrison Ford, particularly when romantic sparks fly with Deputy District Attorney Leslie Sager. The cinematic plot unspools at a smooth pace, cleanly shifting from one scene to the next and allowing readers to put the pieces together themselves. When action erupts, Lansing doesn’t hold back, and the explosive finale reads like something that blockbuster director Michael Bay might dream up. A pulse-pounding thriller with a charming protagonist.

 

Pub Date: Dec. 31, 2012

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 295

Publisher: Gallery Books/Karen Hunter Publishing

Review Posted Online: Sept. 4, 2013

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TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

A first novel, this is also a first person account of Scout's (Jean Louise) recall of the years that led to the ending of a mystery, the breaking of her brother Jem's elbow, the death of her father's enemy — and the close of childhood years. A widower, Atticus raises his children with legal dispassion and paternal intelligence, and is ably abetted by Calpurnia, the colored cook, while the Alabama town of Maycomb, in the 1930's, remains aloof to their divergence from its tribal patterns. Scout and Jem, with their summer-time companion, Dill, find their paths free from interference — but not from dangers; their curiosity about the imprisoned Boo, whose miserable past is incorporated in their play, results in a tentative friendliness; their fears of Atticus' lack of distinction is dissipated when he shoots a mad dog; his defense of a Negro accused of raping a white girl, Mayella Ewell, is followed with avid interest and turns the rabble whites against him. Scout is the means of averting an attack on Atticus but when he loses the case it is Boo who saves Jem and Scout by killing Mayella's father when he attempts to murder them. The shadows of a beginning for black-white understanding, the persistent fight that Scout carries on against school, Jem's emergence into adulthood, Calpurnia's quiet power, and all the incidents touching on the children's "growing outward" have an attractive starchiness that keeps this southern picture pert and provocative. There is much advance interest in this book; it has been selected by the Literary Guild and Reader's Digest; it should win many friends.

Pub Date: July 11, 1960

ISBN: 0060935464

Page Count: 323

Publisher: Lippincott

Review Posted Online: Oct. 7, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1960

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Forget about solving all these crimes; the signal triumph here is (spoiler) the heroine’s survival.

A CONSPIRACY OF BONES

Another sweltering month in Charlotte, another boatload of mysteries past and present for overworked, overstressed forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan.

A week after the night she chases but fails to catch a mysterious trespasser outside her town house, some unknown party texts Tempe four images of a corpse that looks as if it’s been chewed by wild hogs, because it has been. Showboat Medical Examiner Margot Heavner makes it clear that, breaking with her department’s earlier practice (The Bone Collection, 2016, etc.), she has no intention of calling in Tempe as a consultant and promptly identifies the faceless body herself as that of a young Asian man. Nettled by several errors in Heavner’s analysis, and even more by her willingness to share the gory details at a press conference, Tempe launches her own investigation, which is not so much off the books as against the books. Heavner isn’t exactly mollified when Tempe, aided by retired police detective Skinny Slidell and a host of experts, puts a name to the dead man. But the hints of other crimes Tempe’s identification uncovers, particularly crimes against children, spur her on to redouble her efforts despite the new M.E.’s splenetic outbursts. Before he died, it seems, Felix Vodyanov was linked to a passenger ferry that sank in 1994, an even earlier U.S. government project to research biological agents that could control human behavior, the hinky spiritual retreat Sparkling Waters, the dark web site DeepUnder, and the disappearances of at least four schoolchildren, two of whom have also turned up dead. And why on earth was Vodyanov carrying Tempe’s own contact information? The mounting evidence of ever more and ever worse skulduggery will pull Tempe deeper and deeper down what even she sees as a rabbit hole before she confronts a ringleader implicated in “Drugs. Fraud. Breaking and entering. Arson. Kidnapping. How does attempted murder sound?”

Forget about solving all these crimes; the signal triumph here is (spoiler) the heroine’s survival.

Pub Date: March 17, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-9821-3888-2

Page Count: 352

Publisher: Scribner

Review Posted Online: Dec. 23, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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