YOU BETTER COME HOME WITH ME by John Lawson

YOU BETTER COME HOME WITH ME

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The title is the quaint, but confusing farewell of Appalachia, a means of parting without saying goodbye according to the jacket explanation. Adult selectors who found Dorp Dead and Animal Family uncomfortably symbolic will undoubtedly react negatively to You Better ...for better reasons. Both Cunningham's and Jarrel's books have a distinctive style in a field more productive of storytelling energy, and so does Lawson's. But Lawson also has a symbol-obscured approach to his folk-fashioned prose, and a fantasy that gathers in a house broken scarecrow, a snowman who comes to life at each winter's end, a broom-riding witch, a talking fox and a self-isolated Old Man who is waiting for the boy, orphaned, questing, twelve years old, Samuel Hopkins Flood--found on St. Samuel's Day by the Hopkins family after a major deluge wearing a gold ring which has turned his neck green...now welcomed into the cabin of the humanized scarecrow. Who is he, where did he come from, where is he going? Death-in-life, search for identity themes shuttle in, but the fabric of the resulting fantasy does not seem taut enough to support them.

Pub Date: Aug. 15th, 1966
Publisher: Crowell