BIRDS AND PLANES: HOW THEY FLY by John Lewellen
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BIRDS AND PLANES: HOW THEY FLY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A free flowing introduction to flight that uses an inductive method couched in prose that often reads as absorbingly as an exciting novel. A gradual unfolding takes the course of history and explains man's attempts to fly before he actually knew the principles that would spell final success- the curved wing and the pressure creating vacuum with its lifting power. Legends-Daedalus and Icarus; the pioneer work of such as Lebris are recounted. Experimental landmarks and considerable attention to the work of the Wright Brothers and to the wing mechanics of different kinds of birds, make up the bulk of the book. To the author, flying is a natural thing and he has done marvelously in presenting it as one of man's greatest cooperative ventures with nature.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1953
Publisher: Crowell