SECRETS OF ELECTRONIC ESPIONAGE by John M. Carroll

SECRETS OF ELECTRONIC ESPIONAGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The most popular aspect of this subject is personal espionage devices, but this colorful sidelight is slighted in favor of an encyclopedic approach to electronic equipment from 1914 to the space capsule. The itemized devices fall into several categories: listening, intercepting, jamming, ferreting, navigating, etc. While all of these depend on the electron tube (often miniaturized), many operate not on radio waves but light beams some of which can bend around corners. Some famous spy incidents are sketched in lightly (WWII's Sebold case, the U-2 plane incident, the bugged U.S. embassy in Moscow), but the really interesting material is kept for the last chapter. This includes the bug the size of a sugar lump; the machinegun-shaped listening gun which can pick up conversations a block away; the mike in a nail in a wall; the device which can read voice vibrations on a window from across the street... This is the first time such a compilation has been made but it assumes technical savvy on the reader's part since it is more electronics than espionage.

Pub Date: June 30th, 1966
Publisher: Dutton