WEEDS OF LAWN AND GARDEN by John M. Jr. Fogg

WEEDS OF LAWN AND GARDEN

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

This should prove a valuable handbook for the eastern temperate zone of North America -- a book comparable of value, in its field, to guides to wild flowers -- to Hortus (in a limited field) etc. Introductory sections discuss matters of identification and extermination -- dispersal -- geographic origin -- weeds as soil indicators -- characteristics of growth -- pollination, fruits and seeds. Lists indicate presumed origin, -- 78 are of American origin, 21 come from the Orient -- and duplication of European and American weeds is indicated by asterisks, while origin in Europe predominates. Fascinating assemblage of little known (by the neophyte) facts make this section interesting reading for any gardener. The focus of this volume is on the problem of recognition and extermination of such weeds as infest home lawns and gardens. The bulk of the book is taken up with the guide to the weeds:- sketches for identification of weeds, their fruit and seed (by Leonie Hagerty); descriptive matter giving botanical name, popular name, and facts as to locale, growth, how spread, how eradicated, etc. One page is given to each ""weed"" -- and the arrangement follows the accepted family nomenclature. An excellent and useful book, which lacks only the short out to some method of keying identification. The book was done in cooperation with the Morris Arboretum.

Pub Date: April 20th, 1945
Publisher: Univ. of Penna. Press