IT'S ME AND I'M HERE by

IT'S ME AND I'M HERE

By
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KIRKUS REVIEW

A former West Pointer and Ph.D. (humanistic psychology) undergoes a personal awakening and sees the light re his ""overachieving"" past. Lyon recounts his competitive years in search of approval (""environmental support""); his ""numbing"" at West Point, where he was trained not to feel, to be a ""robot""; his erstwhile fascination with pornography, which led to a false charge of peddling, his release from the Army, and his divorce. But with the guidance of his mentors -- Carl Rogers, Baba Ram Dass, Leonard Cohen, and Moshe Feldenkrais -- he soon saw the folly of his ways. In a deluge of sensation and emotion, the consequence of the dam breaking, he voraciously devours a set of right-thinking cliches: he discovers that ""a friend is one who accepts me, not for what I have done, but because I am what I am. . .""; that ""each person in a crowd of people is the center of his own individuality."" Lyon has ""taken pains to be open and real,"" belonging to the strip-yourself-of-your-defenses school of personal growth. He tries to be so psychologically honest that one suspects that the ethic of candor masks a need for a new and different kind of achievement -- it is the same old ball game, this time playing at humanistic psychology. A man coming to a new sense of himself ought to make an invigorating tale -- but Lyon's effusiveness is a bit much.

Pub Date: July 1st, 1974
Publisher: Delacorte