GREAT BRITAIN OR LITTLE ENGLAND by John Mander

GREAT BRITAIN OR LITTLE ENGLAND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

One of this season's most successful parlor games is ""Analyzing the New Britain"", and John Mander's axe-grinding treatise is another version of the same game. For the American market, he is on the side of the angels. His main thesis is that Britain and America have changed postures since W.W. II--the majority British opinion now tending to be neutralist, ""soft on Communism"", and, indeed, isolationist--and this distresses him. America can now throw back all those brickbats it received in 1940. Mander argues that this malaise will not be shaken off until Britain feels herself to be European in every sense of the word. Past mistakes on Fascism and present illusions about Communism are shredded. If there is a villain in the piece, it is Lord Bertrand Russell. The author, who is assistant editor of Encounter, takes pains to debunk prevailing British opinion of their ""glorious"" role in the defeat of Hitler and insists that this exaggerated view of their wartime contribution has made their post-war adjustment extremely difficult. While there is much truth in what he says, a natural tendency to pick quotes to suit his thesis cannot be avoided, and the book reads like a lawyer's submission to the jury before the Court of Public Opinion.

Pub Date: Feb. 11th, 1963
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin