SINCERELY WILLIS WAYDE by John Marquand

SINCERELY WILLIS WAYDE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Today's verson of Dodsworth, with less compassion and more acidity, results in a recognizable portrait of many a top executive, the robber barons who Justify their advances by rationalization and insistence on major virtues. Willis was an ordinary boy when his rolling stone of a father became an inventor and engineer in a New England factory, owned by a family who later sponsored Willis' advance. Always insecure, Willis finally broke his relations with them to move on, but there was always the nagging unsureness that needed outward acceptance. With his marriage came the question of whether or not his wife would be quite so acceptant. While the first half of Willis' story has its own compulsion of interest the last lacks elements of surprise, while Willis grows less convincing, less likeable and wholly predictable as his power increases.

Pub Date: Feb. 24th, 1955
Publisher: Little, Brown