GEORGE WASHINGTON'S SECRET SPY WAR by John A. Nagy

GEORGE WASHINGTON'S SECRET SPY WAR

The Making of America's First Spymaster
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

One intriguing, little-known facet of the first general of the Continental Army: his wholehearted embrace of the art of deception against the British.

A cryptology specialist of the Colonial period, Nagy (Dr. Benjamin Church, Spy: A Case of Espionage on the Eve of the American Revolution, 2013, etc.), who died this year, found that the Founding Father famed for his inability to tell a lie actually embarked on wartime espionage “with childlike glee.” Working with a ragtag army that was no match for the professionalism of the enemy, Washington used espionage to “level the playing field and then exploit it to the best advantage possible.” He honed these skills as a young lieutenant colonel working for Gen. Edward Braddock in the war against the French, rebuffing French raiding parties and making allies with the Indians. As war against Britain became inevitable by 1775, Washington, now the Virginia “gentleman farmer” chosen by the Continental Congress to “lead the mob of Massachusetts malcontents surrounding Boston,” needed spies to infiltrate British ranks in Boston so he could be prepared for their attacks. One of his methods was to use the observances of local fisherman. Uncovering spies for the British presented another problem—e.g., the revelation of Massachusetts revolutionary leader Dr. Benjamin Church Jr.’s traitorous cipher; he had apparently been playing both sides. On the other hand, an important seeker of intelligence on British positions in New York, young Nathan Hale was caught and hanged by the British as a spy. Washington fed false information to British spies, prepared a standardized set of questions to root out real spies, used misdirection in attacking the British, and promoted the ingenious fabrication of invisible ink. Over several chapters, Nagy effectively lays out Washington’s “Deception Battle Plan”—i.e., obscuring where exactly he would attack New York City in 1781, a plan similarly executed so many years later in Operation Overlord (1944) and in Operation Desert Storm (1990-1991).

A knowledgeable study of Washington’s extensive “bag of tricks” to secure victory.

Pub Date: Sept. 20th, 2016
ISBN: 978-1-250-09681-4
Page count: 384pp
Publisher: St. Martin's
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15th, 2016




SIMILAR BOOKS SUGGESTED BY OUR CRITICS:

NonfictionREPORTING THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR by Todd Andrlik
by Todd Andrlik
NonfictionGEORGE WASHINGTON'S SECRET SIX by Brian Kilmeade
by Brian Kilmeade
NonfictionVALIANT AMBITION by Nathaniel Philbrick
by Nathaniel Philbrick