DIGGING UP TYRANNOSAURUS REX by John R. & Don Lessem Horner

DIGGING UP TYRANNOSAURUS REX

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The curator of paleontology at Montana's Museum of the Rockies describes the discovery of a Tyrannosaurus rex fossil and its excavation, and explains its scientific importance. So far, only ten skeletons that are more than 30% complete gave been found; this one (spotted in 1988 by a young woman hiking with her family) was the first to be nearly complete. As such, it's a source of substantial new information, especially concerning the small size and surprising strength of the animal's ""arms"" and the nature of its normal stance: head and tail in a near-horizontal line balanced above the legs, unlike the traditional museum display with dead rampant and tail on the ground. Horner's lucid text, co-authored by the host of PBS's Nova program on the find, details the exacting task of excavating, preserving, and transporting the huge fossil remains; clear color photos give a lively sense of the site and the vigorous, yet meticulous, work. An attractive and informative update on a popular subject and on how real scientists learn more about it. Good select ""Resource Guide"" (lacks dates, but books are recent); rudimentary index.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1992
Page count: 36pp
Publisher: Crown