IN THE STEPS OF THE GREAT AMERICAN ZOOLOGIST, WILLIAM TEMPLE HORNADAY by John Ripley Forbes

IN THE STEPS OF THE GREAT AMERICAN ZOOLOGIST, WILLIAM TEMPLE HORNADAY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Museum work, like library work, does not easily lend itself to juvenile exposition. Although this biography of the great Hornaday begins with fictionalized dialogue, it quickly devolves on diary entries that the dean of American naturalists made. He started from almost nowhere in the midwest and obtained the sort of European degrees expected of experts in anything during the 19th century. Thus equipped, he commanded a following, special among them Teddy Roosevelt who pressed Hornaday's cause for the preservation of the American bison. His contributions to natural history museum growth and their taxidermy exhibits were manifold, but are not made particularly exciting to the juvenile imagination here. There's nothing else around at this level on Hornaday and this has the value of being brief. A major part of the book is given over to descriptions of potential natural history projects that can be carried out by younger readers.

Pub Date: Oct. 25th, 1965
Publisher: Evans