A HISTORY OF SINO-INDIAN RELATIONS by John Rowland

A HISTORY OF SINO-INDIAN RELATIONS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The subtitle is indicative of the general conclusions to be found in this volume, if not of its readable, scholarly approach: ""Hostile Co-Existence."" Mr. Rowland, a U.S Foreign Service officer with long years of experience in that part of the world, begins his account even further back than reliable history, by retelling the ancient myths connecting China, India, and Tibet. At a leisurely pace with a good eye for detail, he develops his graphic thesis. The bias is distinctly towards India, but he does not ignore the many genuinely vague areas of dispute between these Asian Titans. China, he feels, is demonstrably willing ""to use aggression as an instrument of foreign policy in a world which hopes for peace."" (The implication is that India is not--the Goa business notwithstanding.) Divisive and disruptive tactics originating, Rowland says, from Peking, continue to make Indian union and smooth India-Pakistan relations very difficult. The inherent dangers to the well-being of the entire world, he concludes, are very large and show no sign of diminishing.

Publisher: Van Nostrand