MAN, MONEY AND GOODS by John S. Gambs

MAN, MONEY AND GOODS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In a healthy, man-centered philosophical atmosphere Gambs has written a readable, for-the-layman survey of economic theory and practice from Ricardo to Keynes, from gold standard to bust. The author's method, couched in plain, sometimes humorous language, has been to proceed from some representative definitions of economics through explanations and criticism (on grounds of technique rather than ethics) of standard and dissident economic theory and on to economic practices- capitalism, money, pricing, taxing and so forth- as viewed in and of themselves as well as through their theoretical interpretations. As theorists go, Gambs is primarily concerned with Marx and Veblen. The former he dubs teleological and too preconceived for the improvements of science, and the latter a remorseful indictment of man's personal shortcomings. Gambs, though, sides with Veblen and in today's lack of satisfactory doctrine or systems that allow for both technical development and individual freedom, cites the modern economist's need for new ikons of belief and a new study of the individual. The author's biases of free thought and democratic action appear only momentarily, as the book is more a discussion of current economic trends. Although hardly usable as a basic text for introductions to the field because of its essentially too light touch, certain chapters would be of value as reference and the simplicity of approach renders it excellent for the interested lay.

Publisher: Columbia University Press