THE STORY OF AN ENGLISH VILLAGE by John S.--Illus. Goodall

THE STORY OF AN ENGLISH VILLAGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Just that, as seen from the same vantage point--and via the same evolving interior--approximately every hundred years since the 14th century. As social history, this could be an accompaniment to Trevelyan, but for American youngsters of anything near picture-book age it will all be remote and, in the absence of captions or vivid content, largely meaningless. As Goodall notes in his introductory paragraph, ""rural life in England remained remarkably untouched by outside events. . . until the advent of the automobile,"" so the changes are small and gradual--in six centuries, to the untutored child, a progression from simple to fancy old-fashioned. Suddenly, at the last opening, we're in a mad, mod city which, from the looks of things, Goodall doesn't much like--bringing to a sour close centuries of harmony and order.

Pub Date: March 9th, 1979
Publisher: Atheneum (Margaret K. McElderry)