THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE by John Upton Terrell

THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The last third of this book, covering the organization and functions of the Department, has considerable potential usefulness; the balance is moderately interesting if you're interested. After an introduction establishing the preeminence of the Department (""receives more money and spends more than all the other Federal Departments combined"") and Justifying its role (""all the foreign wars...have been termed defensive wars""), the author narrates the history of the army in the Revolution, its abolition thereafter, and the eventual establishment of a standing army; the navy is similarly treated, with special attention to the achievements of the first Secretary of the Navy; the origin of the air force around World War I is sketched in lightly. These sections deal with beginnings; the recent post-unification pact (successive Secretaries of Defense, successive reorganizations) precedes encyclopedic treatment of who does what now (here with special attention to nuclear defense weapons). You know the series; you know the content; you know the market.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1967
Publisher: Meredith