PEOPLE TO PEOPLE THERAPY by John W. Drakeford

PEOPLE TO PEOPLE THERAPY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A modest little introduction to ""Integrity therapy""--i.e., self-help groups--by a minister-psychologist. Drakeford traces the history of this approach, which stresses the role of concerned, non-professional fellow-sufferers in solving personal problems, back to John Wesley and the Methodist ""bands."" He reviews some of the more successful applications of the method--by the Oxford Group, Alcoholics Anonymous, Synanon, and others; and he explains the dynamics of starting and running a self-help group. Drakeford is clear, commensensical, low-key. He has no sectarian are to grind--in fact, there is nothing essentially religious (or irreligious) about the practice. He knows how it works, and he explains it in layman's terms. The only significant flaw in the book is Drakeford's penchant, even mania, for lists. We get the five distinctive features of Wesleyan group life, the six central assumptions of the Oxford Group, the Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous, and on and on and on, a new list every few pages. Apart from that, a reasonable and refreshingly non-dogmatic presentation.

Pub Date: May 31st, 1978
Publisher: Harper & Row