A HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT STORE by John W. Ferry

A HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT STORE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The changing pattern in department store development throughout the English-speaking world is one of the major factors in merchandising. This book, over-crowded perhaps with facts, skirts the surface history of these varied aspects, summarizing some of the major changes, and then goes on to provide thumbnail sketches of the best known department store operations. Things we are thoroughly familiar with here, such as use of United Parcel facilities for deliveries, associations of merchandising operations such as the Federated, the Associated Dry Goods, the Chain stores, are explored. Personalities who have contributed vitality and color and flavor. New York is given a lion's share, with most of the stores known beyond its limitations described; Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco receive due attention; isolated famous stores such as Lazarus in Columbus, Hudson's in Detroit, Rich's in Atlanta, Neiman- Marcus in Dallas, etc. come in for their share. The scene then shifts to the British Commonwealth- from the middle class cooperative societies throughout the British Isles, to specific privately owned stores such as Harrod's, Selfridge's, Liberty, Swan & Edgar, Fortnum & Mason in London, Simpson's and Eaton's in Canada, and representative store operations from Australia and New Zealand to South Africa. Beyond the general reader concerned in anything dealing with phases of Big Business on the retail level, the chief market will be in the specific area covered.

Publisher: Macmillan