A VERY PAROCHIAL MURDER by John Wainright

A VERY PAROCHIAL MURDER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The murder of Jimmy Doyle, teen-age terror of the English seaside town of Rogate-on-Sands, inspires no grief amongst the local citizenry or even in his hard-worn mother. The year before, Doyle was the would-be robber and certain killer of Mary Sutcliffe, mother-in-law of Detective Sergeant Robert Jackson, and was let loose for lack of evidence. Jackson's wife Muriel has sunk into a zombie-like depression. Now, the police have been tipped that Jackson killed Doyle but have no proof. They go through question-and-answer routines with Doyle's cronies and others near the crime scene. Within the department, meanwhile, elliptical instructions are being given--instructions so veiled as to conceal their purpose from the reader let alone the participants. Interspersed are the author's familiar rantings on a variety of subjects (Clouds of Guilt, etc.) and the dull inner musings of Superintendent Crosby, Inspector Lyle, et al. It's no surprise when the quarry escapes. The reader would be smart to do likewise. A low point in Wainwright's up-and-down production.

Pub Date: Oct. 17th, 1988
Publisher: St. Martin's