THE FOREST by John Wainwright

THE FOREST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Lionel Cutter, the narrator of this psychological-suspenser, is the elder, crippled son of very rich, vile-tempered Sir Lionel--whose second marriage has produced son Raymond and daughter Elizabeth. Living alone in a forest cottage on his father's estate, supported by an allowance, sensitive Lionel nurtures a mutual contempt and hatred for half-brother Raymond, along with a frustrating love for half-sister Elizabeth. And then, after some new shocks (an assault from Raymond, a devastating discovery about Sir L.'s will), Lionel devises an elaborate plan to make Raymond his captive in a hidden forest prison--a plan which has to be altered when Sir Lionel suddenly dies. Raymond is freed; Lionel disappears, taking a new identity. But, years later, wild chance draws him back to the forest bunker--for confirmation of his worst fears for beloved Elizabeth, with swift revenge to follow. Absorbing in parts, repetitious and dull in others, with too many questions glibly glossed over: still, one of Wainwright's more imaginative and suspenseful psycho-concoctions.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1984
Publisher: St. Martin's