EXIT WOUNDS by John Westerman

EXIT WOUNDS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Bad cops, good cops, street people, drug-dealers, wives, girlfriends, and a racketeering preacher come to a rolling boil in a story about the rottenest precinct on Long Island. By the policeman who wrote High Crimes (1988--not reviewed). So of course they send one cop to sort it all out. He's Orin Boyd, and his deal is that if he goes in undercover as a crumb-ball policeman in a precinct where crumbiness rules, he will be allowed to collect his checks for the last five years of his career and then punch out. A tough street cop separated from his wife and living in the most sordid apartment ever rented outside the crack world, Boyd is no Boy Scout, but the 13th precinct leaves even him gasping. It's not just that the cops fulfill every citizen's worst dreams with their free meals, on-duty naps, and sticky fingers, or that no female or minority has ever requested a posting to the precinct, or that the officers in charge of the precinct haven't hesitated to murder eyewitnesses to their shenanigans--it's that the whole township seems to be under the very greasy thumb of the Reverend Bubba Sims, an evangelist with a piece of every bit of illegal action in sight, including the police department. What to do? The dirt even seems to be sticking to Orin. But he has a friend in his often married partner George Clarke, and he's not as dumb as his bosses hope. He has a plan. Such a plan. . . Very funny. Very raunchy. Very smart.

Pub Date: Feb. 15th, 1990
Publisher: Soho--dist. by Farrar, Straus & Giroux