THE WAY OF INDIVIDUATION by Jolande Jacobi

THE WAY OF INDIVIDUATION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Jolande Jacobi first met Carl Jung on a social occasion when she was thirty-eight; she then experienced a dream which she described to him, and he replied, ""Now you are caught, now you can't get away."" Dr. Jacobi's studies had been curtailed by marriage at nineteen; Jung insisted that she get her doctorate even though she was physically in danger in pre-World War II Vienna--a danger that became imminent for her husband and sons in Hungary, but saw her to safety in Switzerland, where her life today has, according to David Holt, an ""extraordinarily vivid quality, wounded yet inviolate."" This exposition of Jung's concept of individuation has importance, she feels, for present survival and for shaping the future: it deals with social, ethical, and religious problems through a growing self-awareness of the individual and society. The ""individuation process"" can be experienced in natural (occurring almost autonomously) or artificial form (aided for instance by analysis, developed by definite methods, and consciously experienced). Dr. Jacobi describes the two main phases of life: the transformation with the ""change of dominance"" in the second half; the stages of individuation; the relation of ego and Self; the finding of the ""individual way"" (what is needed is a vocation); conscious realization, the religious factor. A lucid presentation of a major if not dominant theorist which will appeal to a special, predisposed audience.

Pub Date: April 19th, 1967
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World