THE REMARKABLE CURE OF SOLOMON SUNSHINE by

THE REMARKABLE CURE OF SOLOMON SUNSHINE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Like Ponce de Leon and others before and after, Solomon Sunshine will be content with nothing less than the secret of eternal life. The son of a Russian Jew and an Indian princess of a dying tribe, he veers between belief in various native concoctions his father peddles as miracle cures in vain attempts to strike it wealthy, and the squiggly-shaped microbes he studies under the microscope -- with side trips into Cayce and Freud when the going gets rough. Things are complicated by the distinct possibility he may be Maleoki -- the immortal son of an Indian god -- for Solomon is occasionally given to (temporarily) resurrecting the dead, and in general is thought to have magnetic powers of healing by the good people of Boston. Unfortunately he can't do as much for his tubercular lungs, which seem helped only by a pleasant roll in the hay. The real love of his life is his father's mistress Billie, who keeps waiting for Solomon to grow up or, alternately, to be promoted to prostitute in the bar where she works as a waitress. Interesting mainly for its info re the state of turn-of-the-century medicine, when the Food and Drug Law first came into existence -- the author evidently knows whereof he speaks.

Pub Date: June 18th, 1974
Publisher: Prentice-Hall