THE TIME BETWEEN THE WARS by Jonathan Daniels

THE TIME BETWEEN THE WARS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

At about the same depth that years of headline news reading would give, the author takes the reader through twenty years, from the days after WWI to the eve of WWII. It is really a short survey of the Presidential administrations of Harding, Coolidge, Hoover and FDR. It is the political climate that gets the attention and, except as it affected politics, the Depression is scanted both as to cause, effect and lasting result. It is almost a book without surprises for anybody who lived through the times. Almost, but not quite, depending on your capacity for shock. Ours is at the raised eyebrow level. There are four or five mentions of a long liaison between FDR and Lucy Mercer, who had been Eleanor's social secretary cum housekeeper. Despite Mother Sara's pressures, the affair supposedly continued up until 1920. That year, Miss Mercer became Mrs. Winthrop Rutherford; he was an elderly widower. Presumably, FDR's polio prevented further gossip, or activities to base gossip on. However, Mrs. Rutherford had a car especially arranged by FDR at his first inaugural and is said to have visited with him on the day he died. The book is part of the Mainstream of America Series with brush-up value for browsers and chronological digest appeal for students of two crowded decades that seldom get much attention.

Pub Date: Aug. 19th, 1966
Publisher: Doubleday