THE CONTINUING REVOLUTION: A History of Physics from the Greeks to Einstein by Joseph Agassi

THE CONTINUING REVOLUTION: A History of Physics from the Greeks to Einstein

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is an exciting book, more sweeping in scope than the most comparable surveys of this nature (e.g. Cohen's Birth of a New Physics) and yet, through judicious selection, neither tiresome nor lengthy. But it differs from its competitors in a far more significant way; it is not a mere presentation of the content of the various revolutions in physics, nor is it that plus the usual biographic and cultural context; rather it exposes the nature of knowledge in physics by subjecting the discipline to open-ended scrutiny revealing the logic, the necessary implications and weaknesses of each new step in its development. This continuing revolution represents a philosophy best exemplified by Karl Popper, or the historian Thomas Kuhn, and seeing it embodied here for teenagers is indeed stimulating. One word of caution; some readers may be irritated by the Platonic dialogue between father and son which makes up the total presentation. Only this matter of style keeps the book from being superior reading as well as superior science.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1968
Publisher: McGraw-Hill