THE REFORMATION AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE TODAY by Joseph C. McLelland

THE REFORMATION AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE TODAY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Starting with a resume of the Reformation, this McGill University professor seen the method of describing the movement through the lives and teachings of the men who led it. Along with the usual names of Zwingli, Luther, Calvin and Cranmer are several more that are sometimes overlooked, among them, Peter Martyr and John Knox. Also there is a good treatment of the Counter-reformation that so dramatically changed the Roman Church. The author's real interest lies in the danger he sees when Reformed assume the Reformation is over. His concept is that any Protestant Church must continue to protest and to reform itself to meet a changing world with an unchanging Gospel. In fact, he points to signs of real reformation and change in modern Roman Catholicism. Dr. McLelland then points to significant areas where continuing reformation is now needed, especially in the liturgy, and in the sense of vocation. He closes with a challenge to the Church to engage in Holy Worldliness. This book is written in non-technical terms, and it handles difficult and controversial material with great skill. Laymen can understand it, and should read it along with the Clergy.

Pub Date: May 14th, 1962
Publisher: Westminster