WAR DISCOVERS ALASKA by Joseph Drisooli

WAR DISCOVERS ALASKA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A New York Herald Tribune reporter writes an adequate but uninspired book about Alaska. Compared with Jean Potter's Alaska Under Arms (Macmillan-P. 392) this seems machine-made and routine stuff, written to popular pattern, as an overall of Alaska. It seems neither as scholarly in background, nor as informed in foreground as the Potter book. He starts out showing Alaska as the Cinderella country, coming to be appreciated only when its strategic importance was evident. He discusses the racials groups,- the Aleuts, Eskimos, Indians; the brush pilots; the guerilla fighters; the U.S. armed forces. He interviews Admiral Reeves of the Navy, Buckner of the Army, eccentric personalities of local interest, -- sourdoughs, politicians, profiteers. He sketches superficially the life of the women, the night haunts (gambling dens, saloons, etc.). And he ends on the conviction that Alaska is a land of the future, a land of promise.

Pub Date: Feb. 24th, 1943
Publisher: Lippincott