STORM OF DANCERWOOD by Joseph E. Chipperfield

STORM OF DANCERWOOD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A quiet but effective dog story, with a background of English country life- its hunts, its kennels, its retired Army officers enjoying woods and streams. Storm, an Alsatian of proud ancestry, longs to return to the wild life of his forebears, to leave the kennels of which he is the pride. The story is all his- as it shows his deep feeling of kinship with the wild life of the woods, particularly with the blind fox with which he mates, and through whom he meets the one man he can call master. This man is a naturalist, and the strange conflicting loyalties he sees in Storm interest him and the two become fast friends. He learns with Storm of the relentless battle of the woods, the fight for self-preservation. There really is not much plot for adventure in the story, but it is an unusual character study of a dog, and as such children in the lower teens will like it.

Pub Date: Sept. 7th, 1949
Publisher: Longmans, Green