SPIES AND TRAITORS: Tales of the Revolutionary and Civil War by Joseph & Edith Raskin

SPIES AND TRAITORS: Tales of the Revolutionary and Civil War

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KIRKUS REVIEW

These stiff, indifferently fictionalized vignettes are drawn from two separate wars; however the period backgrounds are vague enough to make little impression one way or another (""Richmond, the stately Confederate capital was agog with activity""). And they leave the general impression that spying is a game suitable for clever amateurs (""'It is remarkable how much courage you can muster when left to depend on your wits,' he mused""). The Raskins do provide a bibliography this time (see Guilty or Not Guilty?, 1975) but they have done remarkably little with their inherently dramatic material. (And, incidentally one wonders what the rationale is for adhering to the term ""Negro."") Some of these spies and traitors (the terms are used interchangeably) appear in other Bicentennial roundups or in the Bakeless' spy books; and we can afford to let those who don't remain undercover a little longer.

Pub Date: April 12th, 1976
Page count: 144pp
Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard