CENTURY OF CONFLICT: The Struggle Between the French and British in Colonial America by Joseph Lister Rutledge

CENTURY OF CONFLICT: The Struggle Between the French and British in Colonial America

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KIRKUS REVIEW

History is too formidable, too forbidding a genre. This comes nearer to a personalized view of motivations and themes- political objectives, dreams of building an empire, human weakness- which went into the internal struggles of Canada under Frontenac and its conflict with the colonies of England. Individuals, such as the Canadian governors and their advisors and corrupt enemies, the Indian leader known as the Rat, Phips, Wolfe- all these play their part, and are made as substantial and convincing as possible. It is largely through their eyes, and in terms of their desires and temperaments, that the war is followed. When the action strays away from them, it disappears into so many isolated raids, scalpings, fires, blockade victories, fortifications, false negotiations for false peace agreements. There is little pageantry and no drama- even at the pivotal moment when Quebec falls due to the senseless countermanding of Montcalm's orders. If the author is partly answerable for these charges, the circumstances likewise bring them on- namely, the confused and arbitrary dictates sent from France and England; the nature of war based upon fortified positions for Canada and the naval might of England, with the Indians a disruptive, demonic influence... Vol. II of a Canadian History.

Publisher: Doubleday