DON'T DRAG YOUR FEET by Joseph Low

DON'T DRAG YOUR FEET

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A commonplace, even simpy scenario, related in a matter-of-fact minimum of words, is given reverberant overtones by Low's witty visual rendition of a child's dream. Peggy, who fusses over her toys and wishes the toys could talk back, has a dream in which she is small, and Teddy and the others are big. ""And they could talk. . . but she couldn't talk."" She wakes with the expected empathy--""Never again, Tedder!""--but there's nothing expected about the surreal images of Peggy's dream, in which she's totally at the mercy of whatever animal comes along. In her long skirt and large hat, she looks very much like an old-fashioned doll, while the newly imposing toy animals take on most unpleasant grownup expressions. But that's just the start. Taken up by a giant bird who insists on feeding her a bug, Peggy goes floating through the air past all sorts of strange turnabout scenes before she hits the floor with a bump and wakes up. A light charmer with a firm grip.

Pub Date: March 10th, 1983
Publisher: Atheneum