MCSORLEY'S WONDERFUL SALOON by Joseph Mitchell
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MCSORLEY'S WONDERFUL SALOON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

More of Mitchell's inimitable reporting on characters and places, this time in New York, and the South. There is old McSorley and his ""men-only"" saloon; a ticket taker and bouncer on the Bowery; gypsies and their king; a Greenwich Village author (unpublished); the bearded lady; a nine year old Negro prodigy; people who lived in a cave in Central Park; what happened to a prohibition gin mill and its owner; Calypso songs and singers the founder of an anti-swearing league, beefsteak dinners, clams and diamond back terrapin; sketches of a restaurant-bar regular, a drunk on the wagon; how a Ku Klux Klan movement was halted; picture of a drunken couple he knew as a child in the South.....Nth degree of reportage, that makes for diversified sideline reading. New Yorker readers are a sure market. Good fun.

Pub Date: July 23rd, 1943
Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce